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The Department of Entomology's mission is threefold: To pursue studies to understand basic and applied aspects of insect biology; to provide a robust and modern curriculum as part of preeminent undergraduate and graduate programs; and to inform and educate the public about the issues related to insects and other arthropods. Explore our website to find out more about the department. 

Our faculty primarily works on two campuses: Cornell's main campus in Ithaca, New York and the New York State Agricultural Station in Geneva, New York. We also work in two agricultural field stations in the state of New York.

Are you interested in visiting?

In order to facilitate your visit to the Cornell Entomology Department and allow us a chance to set up meetings with specific individuals who can best answer your questions, please contact Cheryl Gombas cag45@cornell.edu (Ithaca) or Holly King hak3@cornell.edu (Geneva) a week in advance so that we may schedule your visit with appropriate individuals.

 

Grad Student Spotlight

Mary Centrella

Research Interests: The human population is growing and agricultural production must keep up with it! Fruit and seed-set of most crops is dependent upon pollination, yet honeybees appear to be in decline. The pollination gap this has created is currently being filled by solitary bees. As humans change their landscape to produce more crops, what are the ramifications for our solitary pollinators? I study the mason bee Osmia cornifrons to answer this question. At the landscape scale, I am using historical data to document temporal and spatial range changes of this species across the Eastern Seaboard. Locally, I am placing bees in New York apple orchards that range from agricultural to natural surroundings and analyzing their pollen to quantify host-plant diversity and pesticide content. I will follow these field experiments with laboratory experiments to deduce which specific diets and pesticides are most detrimental and/or beneficial to solitary bee fitness. If we understand what conditions are most beneficial for solitary bees, we can design agriculture with them in mind, and conserve both bees and agricultural production.